3, 4, 5, 6, & 8 Wire Throttle Position Sensor Wiring Diagram – TPS Automotive Sensor

Throttle Position Sensor Wiring Diagram

The throttle position sensor (TPS) is a device on the engine that detects the position of the throttle plate. When the throttle is fully open, the TPS sends a signal to the computer that controls fuel injection. The TPS also sends a signal to the ECU when the throttle is closed, so it can adjust timing and fuel delivery accordingly.

The throttle position sensor wiring diagram is a schematic diagram that illustrates the electrical connections between various components within an engine or vehicle. This article will teach you the Wiring Diagram of the Throttle Position Sensor and electronic throttle body.

The wiring of the throttle position sensor may change according to the year, make, and model. The manufacturer designs the wiring of the throttle position sensor based on your requirement and need. At the end of this extremely revealing guide, we will be more general than specific. That’s it! I’m giving you a general idea about how the wiring of the TPS or throttle position sensor is designed.

For your own make and model, you’ll need to check your car owner’s manual. The colors of the wires will differ and are colored according to the brand of the sensor.

Throttle Position Sensor Wiring Diagram

Throttle Position Sensor Is Located On The Shaft Of Butterfly Valve
The Throttle Position Sensor Is Located On The Shaft Of The Butterfly Valve

A throttle position sensor (TPS) is a sensor used to monitor the position of the throttle plate in an internal combustion engine. The sensor is usually a variable resistor that produces an output voltage proportional to the throttle plate’s position. The voltage is typically used by the engine management system to control fuel injection, ignition timing, and other engine parameters.

The TPS is usually a potentiometer, which creates a voltage based on the position of the throttle. This voltage is sent to the ECU, which uses it to make its calculations.

Potentiometer Icon
Potentiometer Icon

Rotary potentiometers are used in a wide range of applications, from volume controls on stereo equipment to the sensors that determine the air-fuel mixture in an engine. In each case, the potentiometer’s resistance varies as the wiper moves along the resistor track.

A potentiometer consists of three wires, earth, hot power, and a signal wire (wiper). The potentiometer is usually connected as part of a voltage divider circuit, with one end of the divider connected to the earth (ground) and the other end connected to some higher voltage. The signal wire is connected to the car computer. As the wiper moves along the resistor track, it varies the amount of voltage applied to the component.

The TPS reports this information to the engine control unit (ECU) so that it can regulate the air/fuel mixture and ignition timing accordingly.

3 Wire Throttle Position Sensor Wiring Diagram

3 Wire Throttle Position Sensor Wiring Diagram
3 Wire Throttle Position Sensor Wiring Diagram

A three-pin throttle position sensor has three wires:

  • Hot Power Wire (Reference voltage comes from the ECU)
  • Ground Wire
  • Signal Wire (Gives Signals to the ECU)

All the wires are connected to the car computer. The hot wire is a feed source that is taken from the automobile computer (ECU). This reference potential means that the auto ECU Provides 5-volt power to the TPS sensor through this wire. The ground wire is additionally taken from the ECU. This ground wire offers ground to the TPS sensor.

A third wire is a signal wire which sends the information (signal) from the sensor to the car’s computer through this wire. This wire can generate a 0 to 5-volt signal. The sensor’s signal output wire should, ideally, be close to 0V when the throttle is closed and close to 5V when the throttle is wide open. The ECU monitors the signal wire and uses it to calculate the engine’s throttle position. These kinds of sensors are used in cable-operated throttle bodies.

4 Pin Throttle Position Sensor Wiring Diagram

4 Pin Throttle Position Sensor Wiring Diagram
4 Pin Throttle Position Sensor Wiring Diagram

A throttle position sensor is a type of sensor used in automotive applications to monitor the position of the throttle. A four-wire throttle position sensor has four wires, two are the signal wires, and two are earth and hot.

  • Signal Wire (Sensor 1)
  • Signal Wire (Sensor 2)
  • Hot Power Wire (Reference voltage comes from the ECU)
  • Ground Wire

A four-pin throttle position sensor has two potentiometers inside which have common earth and hot wires. The two signal wires are responsible for transmitting the throttle position data to the ECU, while the other two wires are used for grounding and power. The car computer (ECU) Supplies 5 volts of power (reference voltage) to the TPS sensor via a “hot power” wire. All the wires are connected to the car computer.

A four-wire throttle position sensor contains two potentiometers, so it uses two signal wires to read the output of each potentiometer. This allows the sensor to accurately track the position of the throttle plate. By measuring the voltage at these two points, the sensor can determine how far open or closed the throttle is.

5 Pin Throttle Position Sensor Wiring Diagram

5 Pin Throttle Position Sensor Wiring Diagram
5 Pin Throttle Position Sensor Wiring Diagram

The sensor measures the angle of the throttle plate in relation to the engine and sends this information to the car’s computer, which then adjusts things like air/fuel mixture and ignition timing accordingly.

A five-pin throttle position sensor has one motor and one sensor. It has five wires in total, two for motor, one signal, one earth, and one hot power wire. All the wires are connected directly to the car computer (ECU).

  • Motor Positive
  • Motor Negative
  • Signal Wire
  • Hot Power Wire (5 Volt Reference voltage comes from the ECU)
  • Ground Wire

The 5-pin throttle position sensor’s two wires (positive and negative wires) are connected to the computerized control module. This allows the module to control the throttle’s motor.

Another wire is the signal wire, which helps the throttle position sensor supply input to the vehicle control system via this wire.

The hot wire is a power source that is taken from the car computer (ECU) for the throttle position sensor. This hot wire provides a 5-volt reference voltage to the throttle position sensor, allowing ECU power through the wire. The last wire is the ground wire supplies earth to this TPS sensor.

6 Pin Throttle Position Sensor Wiring Diagram

6 Pin Throttle Position Sensor Wiring Diagram
6 Pin Throttle Position Sensor Wiring Diagram (Drive By Wire Throttle)

There are two types of throttle having 6-pin wiring. One is the drive-by-wire (electronic) throttle and the second is the cable-operated throttle body. Below is the drive-by-wire six-pin (electronic) throttle body wiring diagram.

  • Motor Positive
  • Motor Negative
  • Signal Wire (Sensor 1)
  • Signal Wire (Sensor 2)
  • Hot Power Wire (5 Volt Reference voltage comes from the ECU)
  • Ground Wire

A six-pin electronic throttle body contains one motor and two potentiometers (sensors). It has six wires in total, two for the motor, two are signals, and two are earth/hot wires. These six-pin sensors have common ground and hot wires.

The hot wire is a feed power that is taken from the car computer (ECU) for both sensors. This hot wire provides a 5-volt reference voltage to the throttle position sensor, enabling the ECU to power the TPS sensor through this wire.

The ground wire of both sensors is also taken from the ECU. This ground wire provides earth to the TPS sensor. A third wire is the signal wire, which means the throttle position sensor provides input to the car ECU through this wire.

6 Pin Throttle Position Sensors Wiring Diagram
6 Pin Throttle Position Sensor Wiring Diagram (Cable-Operated Throttle

Here is the wiring diagram of the cable-operated throttle body.

  • Signal Wire (Sensor 1)
  • Hot Power Wire (5 Volt Reference voltage comes from the ECU)
  • Earth Wire
  • Signal Wire (Sensor 2)
  • Hot Power Wire (5 Volt Reference voltage comes from the ECU)
  • Earth Wire

A cable-operated six-pin throttle position sensor has two potentiometers (sensors). It has six wires in total, two for signals, two are earth and two are hot wires. These six-pin sensors have two separate ground, hot and signal wires. Every potentiometer (sensor) has its own separate signal, ground, and hot wires. All the wires are connected to the car computer.

The 6-pin throttle position sensor has two sensors for redundancy means if one sensor fails the other will still work. This is an important feature for ensuring that the throttle position sensor continues to function properly even if one of the sensors fails so that you can get to the workshop. This is like having two eyes to see with – if one eye is damaged, the other one can still see.

8 Pin Throttle Position Sensor Wiring Diagram

8 Pin Throttle Position Sensor Wiring Diagram
8 Pin Throttle Position Sensor Wiring Diagram

An 8-pin throttle position sensor has a total of eight wires, the inside of which are two for the motor, two are signals, two are earth, and two are hot wires. These eight-pin sensors have two separate ground, hot, and signal wires. Each potentiometer (sensor) has its individual signal, ground, and hot wires.

  • Motor Positive
  • Motor Negative
  • Signal Wire (Sensor 1)
  • Hot Power Wire (Reference voltage comes from the ECU)
  • Ground Wire
  • Signal Wire (Sensor 2)
  • Hot Power Wire (Reference voltage comes from the ECU)
  • Ground Wire

An eight-pin throttle position sensor contains one motor and two potentiometers. The 8-pin throttle position sensor has two sensors for redundancy. If one sensor fails, the other will continue to function to keep the system functioning. This is done for redundancy, or as a backup in case something goes wrong. For example, if you have two eyes, and one is injured, the other eye can still see. This is because you have redundancy.

The 8-pin throttle position sensor has two wires (positive and negative wires) for the motor that is connected to the car’s computer system. This allows the computer to control the throttle’s motor.

The feed power is taken from the car computer (ECU) for both sensors, which is the hot wire, which supplies a 5-volt reference voltage to the throttle position sensor. This hot wire enables the ECU to power this sensor through the wire.

The ground wire of both sensors is also pulled from the ECU. This ground wire provides earth to the TPS sensor. A third wire is the signal wire, so the throttle position sensor gives input to the car ECU through this wire.

Electronic Throttle Body Wiring Diagram

Electronic Throttle Body
Electronic Throttle Body

The electronic throttle body wiring diagram comes in two different wiring numbers. Some electronic throttle body has six wires while other have eight wires.

A Six wire electronic throttle body has two wires for the motor, two are signals and two are earth/hot. A six-wire throttle body’s sensors have common earth and hot wires. It has the same wiring diagram, we covered in the six-pin wiring diagram. I am again posting the diagram of the six-pin electronic throttle body here.

6 Pin Throttle Position Sensor Wiring Diagram
6 Pin Throttle Position Sensor Wiring Diagram (Drive By Wire Throttle)
  • Motor Positive
  • Motor Negative
  • Signal Wire (Sensor 1)
  • Signal Wire (Sensor 2)
  • Hot Power Wire (Reference voltage comes from the ECU)
  • Ground Wire

The eight-wire electronic throttle body wiring diagram is the same covered in the eight-pin throttle position sensor wiring diagram. It has two wires for the motor – two are signal, two are earth and two are hot wires. I am posting again the diagram of the eight-pin wiring diagram.

8 Pin Throttle Position Sensor Wiring Diagram
8 Pin Throttle Position Sensor Wiring Diagram
  • Motor Positive
  • Motor Negative
  • Signal Wire (Sensor 1)
  • Hot Power Wire (Reference voltage comes from the ECU)
  • Ground Wire
  • Signal Wire (Sensor 2)
  • Hot Power Wire (Reference voltage comes from the ECU)
  • Ground Wire

An electronic throttle body has one motor and two sensors for redundancy means if one sensor breaks the other still functions. The two sensors measure how much air is coming into the engine. If one sensor fails, the other sensor can still measure how much air is coming in, so the engine will still work. So, if one goes bad, the other can still send information to the computer. This is done as a backup in case something goes wrong with one of the sensors.

The electronically controlled throttle body has two wires (which are a little thick) for the motor’s positive and negative that are connected to the car’s computer. This allows the computer to monitor and control the throttle’s position.

When the driver presses the accelerator pedal, a signal is sent to the car’s computer, telling it how much power is needed. The computer then sends power to the electronic throttle body through these positive and negative wires of the motor.

The electronic throttle body sends a signal to the car computer which then calculates how much fuel to inject into the engine in order to maintain the desired air-fuel ratio and timing accordingly. The car computer also uses input from other sensors, such as the mass airflow sensor and the throttle position sensor, to make its calculations.

The signal wires send a signal to the car computer to tell it how far the throttle plate (butterfly valve) is open. These two signal wires carry the voltage that is used to determine the position of the throttle plate, while the earth and hot wire provide power and ground to the sensor.

FAQs

How many wires does a TPS sensor have?

A TPS sensor has between 3 to 8 wires. The number of wires depends on the specific sensor and the make and model of the vehicle. All of the TPS sensors have basic three wires. The first wire is the power wire, the second wire is the ground wire, and the third wire is the signal wire. Some TPS sensors have dual sensors in one unit, and some have an electric motor that increases the number of wires. The TPS harness is an electrical cable that acts as a conduit for electrical signals between the sensor and other components that are located within the vehicle, such as the engine management systems.

Is there a fuse for the throttle position sensor?

There is no fuse for the throttle position sensor; however, there is a fuse for the ECM. The ECM controls the throttle position sensor, so if the ECM fuse is blown, the sensor will not work.

What are the 3 wires on a TPS sensor?

The three basic wires on a TPS sensor are the power wire, the ground wire, and the signal wire. The power wire provides power to the sensor, the ground wire provides a path for the current to flow, and the signal wire sends a signal to the ECU.

Will disconnecting the battery reset throttle position sensor?

Yes, disconnecting the battery will reset the throttle position sensor. However, this is only a temporary solution and the sensor may need to be recalibrated after reconnecting the battery. To do this, you can disconnect the battery for up to five minutes. Additionally, you may need to replace the throttle position sensor if it does not reset.

What are the symptoms of a failed throttle position sensor?

The most common symptoms of a failed throttle position sensor are poor acceleration, rough idle, and a check engine light on your dashboard. Other signs include lacking power when accelerating, slow or rough idle, stalling, difficulty shifting gears, and the check engine light turning on. If you notice any of these symptoms, it is important to have your throttle position sensor inspected by a professional mechanic.

Related Post: 9 Symptoms Of A Bad Throttle Position Sensor You Never Knew

How do you test a 6 wire throttle position sensor?

A faulty throttle position sensor can cause OBD-2 codes. In order to test a 6 wire throttle position sensor, one must first determine the electrical characteristics of the individual wires (attached to the throttle). This can be done by measuring the voltage and resistance of each terminal with a digital multimeter. Once the electrical characteristics are known, it is necessary to connect the wires in a specific configuration based on the manufacturer’s instructions.

Related Post: Testing Throttle Position Sensor With & Without Multimeter


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